Newspaper Archive of
The Ely Echo
Ely, Minnesota
Lyft
January 5, 2013     The Ely Echo
PAGE 7     (7 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 5, 2013
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ely Echo produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2017. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Section I THE ELY F_.,00HO PAGE 7 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5,, 2013 The Paul Summer story- a history lesson Part 2. The losses and the looting at Pipestone Editor's note: Last week, Iron Range natives, Paul and Edna Summer told of events leading up to the years 1959-1960. by Anne Swenson The United States Forest Service was nego- tiating with the Summers for thei[ resort, Pipe- stone Fails Lodge on lower Basswood' Lake and approximately 500 acres of land. Voluntarily the Summers had sold 180 acres of land. As Paul commented: "But the government wanted everything ... they got everything. " The amphibious war surplus ducks which were used by the Summers to carry their paying guests and other supplies were deemed unsafe for public transport. Soldiers had been expendable. Tourists were not. The Coast Guard refused to certify the vehicles. For two weeks at the start of the 1959 season Paul Summer hauled no more than six people in the ducks to avoid the vehicles being considered transport. It was impractical. Paul went back to carrying people in the ducks in violation. Paul had asked the Coast Guardsmen, "Who's going to be around to see whether I'm doing this or that? "They weren't obnoxious or anything. They were just doing their job, I suppose. They just kind of winked, laughed, and said, 'Well, we'll be leaving in a week and we won't be back 'til next spring.' They didn't care. I'm sure they didn't blow the whistle on me. But just before the fourth of July I got a letter from the Coast Guard office in Duluth, Col. Kirkpatrick. I re- member the letter well, very testy: 'It has come to the attention of this office you are using these ve.hicles in violation. This practice will cease immediately. '" "So that closed us," Edna noted. Paul added, "That was jerking the mg out. There was a whole season ahead of us. No way to get the people in or out or anything else. This was just at a critical point of the negotiation with the (U.S.) EARLY ELY AREA LODGES: 1. Quetico Lodge 2. Evergreen Lodge 3. Pete's Cabin Boats 4. Peterson's Fishing Camp 5. Basswood Lodge 6. Basswood Beach 7. Skidway Borderline Lodge 8. Maple Leaf Lodge 9. Su-Sha-Nan 10. Beaver Island Lodge 11. Johnson Bros. Fishing Camp 12. Pipestone Falls Lodge Echo Trail Jackflsh PIPESTONE FALLS LODGE with it. I finished the season out in violation of Kirkpatrick, Coast Guai'd and everybody else. I kept on operating the ducks. But-that was that. I signed." American Indian tribesmen had tried to befriend the early settlers by giving them "a small seat" only to have more settlers come. The Seneca Chief Red Jacket in 1805 declared: "We did not fear them. We took them to be friends; they called us brothers. We believed them and gave them a larger seat. At length their number had greatly increased; they wanted more land; they wanted our country."" To achieve government ends, there can be no doubt that harassment, trickery and deception were used against the American Indian nations. The Indians had expected the United States government to be fair and honorable. Is there evidence that government policies in regard to land grabs have changed? O0 #, "We had a year to salvage," Paul continued. "They stipulated we could take anything we wanted plus three cabins, but we couldn't have the ducks. Here's another dirty thing that really burned me. We cooperated with them on their razing the camp. They had a crew up there that was busy cleaning out all the rest of the camps they had taken over. They asked me if they could come in and raze some of this stuff ahead of the year's time and immediately start razing it. I said I don't really care as long as what we want is left untouched. I even went to the extent of letting them stay in one of the cabins. "So what did they do? They got in on my waiver, and in agreement for that waiver they told me that I could have the ducks. I had a mar- ket for them. I could have sold them to the (Wis- consin) Dells outfit. In fact, I had three buyers. "This was in the ranger's office in front of Wesley White and Ralph Graves. Just a verbal sort of a deal. We'll give you the waiver and you can go in a year ahead of time and raze the camp and I'll get the ducks. I said, how does this happen? How do I get the ducks away from you people? White said, 'You make a token bid, like Sq Lake The years of fighting for their land are over. Paul and Edna Summer now r their interest in old things with Paul's talent as a potter. them out in the lake. They were floating all over . the place. I'm sure bedsprings and everytlting else is out in the lake. "Here's another galling thing. I gave them the use of my little crawler tractor and they took my truck and dragged the truck around on flat tires. They piled all this junk, bedsprings and all this stuff from the camp on the truck and then dragged it with the tractor. They didn't run it. They dragged the whole damn mess out in the swamp. The truck was mined. They'd pulled an axle loose. "I didn't get the ducks. I kept pestering them on several occasions. Of course we were busy. I didn't have time to push it too hard. They just kept sidestepping. They wouldn't give me the forms for this token bid. They just dragged it out and dragged it out. Finally they just came out and took the ducks. And the agreement was all verbal. Somebody told me later they saw the Pipestone ducks down at the Wisconsin Dells. Basswood Lake CANADA Lake CAN00 /Vk00$e L.eke years. Then they burned it." They were the last resort on Pipestone Bay, lower Basswood, to be purchased by the gov- ernment. "The only holdout after us," Paul said,"was Billy Zup on Crooked Lake and Jack Hanson on the upper part of Basswood. Of course at that time there wasn't the public clamor. There was no public support. They just nipped us off one by one. They didn't have these mass meetings. Nobody seemed to care. There was a little static. The Chamber of Commerce wasa3 . :31t,et, You didn't lmv any group of g together, ailuil$ about this, W' i loss? :' 'IN00 by t od00y'00 mndards:000000 i don. t think we:Oerel But we dialer too much oil it, because the ha the wail. It was cut and dried do? You just pick up and start o11 ' tially, of course, they don't corn lXlt. "  the value of the land and the imprV all that. The other thing they don't co- l you for is the 14 years a guy pu Ul.t.f4 prime years. They disregard that,;Tfa' ing. Fifteen years later do you start out ftm tlte bottom again, and enter anything with the same enthusiasm and drive? That really kills you." Paul toyed with the idea of going back to school. "I gave up five-six years of G.I. Bill. I never asked the government for a damn thing." Forest Service. We had just gotten this letter and a couple of purchasing agents for the Forest Service were flying out to the place: 'We heard this. Oh, we're so surprised. How could anything like this happen?' "They were trying to deny any collusion, but I'm certain that there was collusion involved in it. To make a long story short, I said to hell a dollar apiece and we'll sign them back to you.' "So they razed the camp. Destroyed a lot of stuff that we would have salvaged. They destroyed all my fifty gallon drums. I went into the woods one day from town to see what was going on. I found all my gasoline barrels bob- bing around in the bay there. They had run an axe through the end of all of them, and just threw At their home in Winton Paul and Edna Summer enjoyed their collection of Indian artifacts and Western art. Paul Summer died in 1982 and his wife Edna died in 2008. They are survived by four daughters. Photos by Anne Swenson Road In other words, the government had sold them to the guy I could have sold them to." To add to the Summers loss, a lot of their belongings were stolen during the salvage year. "People from town went thru and picked things up," Edna said. "There was nothing you could do about it." Paul explained: "There was a lot of looting up there, or what you'd call looting. People didn't regard it as such. But they got wind of the fact that the government was buying all this, and 'if it belongs to the government, it belongs to ev- erybody.' That was their way of thinking. There were roads plowed in the winter to various places and that made it accessible to everybody. There was quite a bit of looting going on. "The land is now part of the BWCA. They razed everything. The Forest Service tried to destroy all evidence that the white man had ever been there. We did have the use of one cabin for five years, but the firm thing the govemraent did was destroy the well. ' So we had a cabill, and had to dip out of the lake. "The cabin was right on the portage. Ev- erybody knew the government owned it and therefore it was 'free' for anybody's use, So constantly there were things stolen out lff R'and trash left all over, from canoeists and fishermen. The government even had the gall to upbraid me once in an official letter: that if I didn' t keep the place cleaner ,ukl terminate the lease. It wasn't even my trash! I was he|plessl I think I told them what to do with their letter and their suggestions. We did keep the cabin for the five The Summers family took their first vaca- tion in years to think it over. The three salvaged cabins which Paul had hauled and reassembled ' at their Fall Lake landing base near Wh'lton be- came the basis for his small resort and 0 business there. . , : The S  Pi constructed .three Finnish gs. 'ng representative of eve ai'iff;2\\; explains. "I'm particularly interested in PNi Indians, maybe because they defied the govern- ' ment longer than anybody, which I admi them . for, especially the Sioux, Nez Perce, , " Apaches. I maybe feel a kinship wi i cause they got shafted too."  Edna worked part-time at Marguedte's in , 1977 and enjoyed painting and crewel wock. The couple also shared an interest in golf. lut they " always came back to their home here. "In all our travels," Paul said, "we haven't , found a section of the country that has more to offer. I'm convinced we have a lot more freedom ' here, even with the restrictions that are piling in t,, on us daily. We still have more freedom of move- ment, more area to get lost in, than anybody else  in the country." In discussing the current (1977-1978) BWCA controversy Paul stated that thouglll " to mining in o BWCA, he thtil,  .i motors and snowmobiles could ': : certain designm routes, and m" harvesting allowed. " "-'*'. ;'" " ' # : - betwn tlltWo.lfills,' he stted;.,.. count on it: People around hdre'It,l about it,:00 have Althongh,,ghishs just a small 1 we rias  the rest of the as tiieirs.  !' ::?:i ' Chief Red Jacket didn't say iLily :::: ; :: , Section I THE ELY F_.,00HO PAGE 7 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5,, 2013 The Paul Summer story- a history lesson Part 2. The losses and the looting at Pipestone Editor's note: Last week, Iron Range natives, Paul and Edna Summer told of events leading up to the years 1959-1960. by Anne Swenson The United States Forest Service was nego- tiating with the Summers for thei[ resort, Pipe- stone Fails Lodge on lower Basswood' Lake and approximately 500 acres of land. Voluntarily the Summers had sold 180 acres of land. As Paul commented: "But the government wanted everything ... they got everything. " The amphibious war surplus ducks which were used by the Summers to carry their paying guests and other supplies were deemed unsafe for public transport. Soldiers had been expendable. Tourists were not. The Coast Guard refused to certify the vehicles. For two weeks at the start of the 1959 season Paul Summer hauled no more than six people in the ducks to avoid the vehicles being considered transport. It was impractical. Paul went back to carrying people in the ducks in violation. Paul had asked the Coast Guardsmen, "Who's going to be around to see whether I'm doing this or that? "They weren't obnoxious or anything. They were just doing their job, I suppose. They just kind of winked, laughed, and said, 'Well, we'll be leaving in a week and we won't be back 'til next spring.' They didn't care. I'm sure they didn't blow the whistle on me. But just before the fourth of July I got a letter from the Coast Guard office in Duluth, Col. Kirkpatrick. I re- member the letter well, very testy: 'It has come to the attention of this office you are using these ve.hicles in violation. This practice will cease immediately. '" "So that closed us," Edna noted. Paul added, "That was jerking the mg out. There was a whole season ahead of us. No way to get the people in or out or anything else. This was just at a critical point of the negotiation with the (U.S.) EARLY ELY AREA LODGES: 1. Quetico Lodge 2. Evergreen Lodge 3. Pete's Cabin Boats 4. Peterson's Fishing Camp 5. Basswood Lodge 6. Basswood Beach 7. Skidway Borderline Lodge 8. Maple Leaf Lodge 9. Su-Sha-Nan 10. Beaver Island Lodge 11. Johnson Bros. Fishing Camp 12. Pipestone Falls Lodge Echo Trail Jackflsh PIPESTONE FALLS LODGE with it. I finished the season out in violation of Kirkpatrick, Coast Guai'd and everybody else. I kept on operating the ducks. But-that was that. I signed." American Indian tribesmen had tried to befriend the early settlers by giving them "a small seat" only to have more settlers come. The Seneca Chief Red Jacket in 1805 declared: "We did not fear them. We took them to be friends; they called us brothers. We believed them and gave them a larger seat. At length their number had greatly increased; they wanted more land; they wanted our country."" To achieve government ends, there can be no doubt that harassment, trickery and deception were used against the American Indian nations. The Indians had expected the United States government to be fair and honorable. Is there evidence that government policies in regard to land grabs have changed? O0 #, "We had a year to salvage," Paul continued. "They stipulated we could take anything we wanted plus three cabins, but we couldn't have the ducks. Here's another dirty thing that really burned me. We cooperated with them on their razing the camp. They had a crew up there that was busy cleaning out all the rest of the camps they had taken over. They asked me if they could come in and raze some of this stuff ahead of the year's time and immediately start razing it. I said I don't really care as long as what we want is left untouched. I even went to the extent of letting them stay in one of the cabins. "So what did they do? They got in on my waiver, and in agreement for that waiver they told me that I could have the ducks. I had a mar- ket for them. I could have sold them to the (Wis- consin) Dells outfit. In fact, I had three buyers. "This was in the ranger's office in front of Wesley White and Ralph Graves. Just a verbal sort of a deal. We'll give you the waiver and you can go in a year ahead of time and raze the camp and I'll get the ducks. I said, how does this happen? How do I get the ducks away from you people? White said, 'You make a token bid, like Sq Lake The years of fighting for their land are over. Paul and Edna Summer now r their interest in old things with Paul's talent as a potter. them out in the lake. They were floating all over . the place. I'm sure bedsprings and everytlting else is out in the lake. "Here's another galling thing. I gave them the use of my little crawler tractor and they took my truck and dragged the truck around on flat tires. They piled all this junk, bedsprings and all this stuff from the camp on the truck and then dragged it with the tractor. They didn't run it. They dragged the whole damn mess out in the swamp. The truck was mined. They'd pulled an axle loose. "I didn't get the ducks. I kept pestering them on several occasions. Of course we were busy. I didn't have time to push it too hard. They just kept sidestepping. They wouldn't give me the forms for this token bid. They just dragged it out and dragged it out. Finally they just came out and took the ducks. And the agreement was all verbal. Somebody told me later they saw the Pipestone ducks down at the Wisconsin Dells. Basswood Lake CANADA Lake CAN00 /Vk00$e L.eke years. Then they burned it." They were the last resort on Pipestone Bay, lower Basswood, to be purchased by the gov- ernment. "The only holdout after us," Paul said,"was Billy Zup on Crooked Lake and Jack Hanson on the upper part of Basswood. Of course at that time there wasn't the public clamor. There was no public support. They just nipped us off one by one. They didn't have these mass meetings. Nobody seemed to care. There was a little static. The Chamber of Commerce wasa3 . :31t,et, You didn't lmv any group of g together, ailuil$ about this, W' i loss? :' 'IN00 by t od00y'00 mndards:000000 i don. t think we:Oerel But we dialer too much oil it, because the ha the wail. It was cut and dried do? You just pick up and start o11 ' tially, of course, they don't corn lXlt. "  the value of the land and the imprV all that. The other thing they don't co- l you for is the 14 years a guy pu Ul.t.f4 prime years. They disregard that,;Tfa' ing. Fifteen years later do you start out ftm tlte bottom again, and enter anything with the same enthusiasm and drive? That really kills you." Paul toyed with the idea of going back to school. "I gave up five-six years of G.I. Bill. I never asked the government for a damn thing." Forest Service. We had just gotten this letter and a couple of purchasing agents for the Forest Service were flying out to the place: 'We heard this. Oh, we're so surprised. How could anything like this happen?' "They were trying to deny any collusion, but I'm certain that there was collusion involved in it. To make a long story short, I said to hell a dollar apiece and we'll sign them back to you.' "So they razed the camp. Destroyed a lot of stuff that we would have salvaged. They destroyed all my fifty gallon drums. I went into the woods one day from town to see what was going on. I found all my gasoline barrels bob- bing around in the bay there. They had run an axe through the end of all of them, and just threw At their home in Winton Paul and Edna Summer enjoyed their collection of Indian artifacts and Western art. Paul Summer died in 1982 and his wife Edna died in 2008. They are survived by four daughters. Photos by Anne Swenson Road In other words, the government had sold them to the guy I could have sold them to." To add to the Summers loss, a lot of their belongings were stolen during the salvage year. "People from town went thru and picked things up," Edna said. "There was nothing you could do about it." Paul explained: "There was a lot of looting up there, or what you'd call looting. People didn't regard it as such. But they got wind of the fact that the government was buying all this, and 'if it belongs to the government, it belongs to ev- erybody.' That was their way of thinking. There were roads plowed in the winter to various places and that made it accessible to everybody. There was quite a bit of looting going on. "The land is now part of the BWCA. They razed everything. The Forest Service tried to destroy all evidence that the white man had ever been there. We did have the use of one cabin for five years, but the firm thing the govemraent did was destroy the well. ' So we had a cabill, and had to dip out of the lake. "The cabin was right on the portage. Ev- erybody knew the government owned it and therefore it was 'free' for anybody's use, So constantly there were things stolen out lff R'and trash left all over, from canoeists and fishermen. The government even had the gall to upbraid me once in an official letter: that if I didn' t keep the place cleaner ,ukl terminate the lease. It wasn't even my trash! I was he|plessl I think I told them what to do with their letter and their suggestions. We did keep the cabin for the five The Summers family took their first vaca- tion in years to think it over. The three salvaged cabins which Paul had hauled and reassembled ' at their Fall Lake landing base near Wh'lton be- came the basis for his small resort and 0 business there. . , : The S  Pi constructed .three Finnish gs. 'ng representative of eve ai'iff;2\\; explains. "I'm particularly interested in PNi Indians, maybe because they defied the govern- ' ment longer than anybody, which I admi them . for, especially the Sioux, Nez Perce, , " Apaches. I maybe feel a kinship wi i cause they got shafted too."  Edna worked part-time at Marguedte's in , 1977 and enjoyed painting and crewel wock. The couple also shared an interest in golf. lut they " always came back to their home here. "In all our travels," Paul said, "we haven't , found a section of the country that has more to offer. I'm convinced we have a lot more freedom ' here, even with the restrictions that are piling in t,, on us daily. We still have more freedom of move- ment, more area to get lost in, than anybody else  in the country." In discussing the current (1977-1978) BWCA controversy Paul stated that thouglll " to mining in o BWCA, he thtil,  .i motors and snowmobiles could ': : certain designm routes, and m" harvesting allowed. " "-'*'. ;'" " ' # : - betwn tlltWo.lfills,' he stted;.,.. count on it: People around hdre'It,l about it,:00 have Althongh,,ghishs just a small 1 we rias  the rest of the as tiieirs.  !' ::?:i ' Chief Red Jacket didn't say iLily :::: ; :: ,